ZarchivesUpdatesArtPaintingLightning Paintings

Lightning Paintings

“It was well after the witching hour, and many moons ago when I was driving home from my painting studio in Albany, New York, to the city of Troy.  The roads were an empty, slick asphaltum black that darkened as it began to rain.  My chariot and I were driving through water deep enough to have its own current (pardon the pun) when the lightning struck…”

In case you missed it, you can read the full story behind these lightning paintings HERE.

In recent years, I’ve made a lot of Lightning Paintings.  If you haven’t read the unbelievable story behind those, you can catch up on the origins of Lightning Hall here.  For now, it seemed appropriate to pause and begin to gather them all here.

Lightning Paintings by contemporary artist Sarah Zar
BOLT GATHERING (detail). 6 1/4 x 10 inches. Oil on paper.
An oil painting of little children collecting wild lightning bolts in nature, by Sarah Zar
BOLT GATHERING. 6 1/4 x 10 inches. Oil on paper.

 

Lady In Red With Lightning, oil painting, art by Sarah Zar
Lady In Red With Lightning. 7 7/8 x 8 inches, oil paint on paper, 2019.
Painted portrait of a woman channeling lightning with hands folded in her lap, by Sarah Zar. Elemental magic artwork, materia prima alchemy exhibition.
CHANNEL, Oracles & Evacuations Series, oil on paper, 2016. For Stephen Romano’s Materia Prima show at Blam Gallery.
DANCE OF THE STORM WITCH (detail), Oracles & Evacuations series, oil on paper, ~8″ x 12″

Symbolism in Lightning Paintings

From the bane of Odysseus to the meeting place of Shakespeare’s witches, lightning has been associated with illumination, premonition, intuition, and more since before the singing of the first song. In literature, life, or dream, what does lightning represent to all of you?

Tell me about it on Instagram, where you can see what’s created in Lightning hall before the rest of the world, and make offers on new artwork before it gets to the galleries: @sarahzarstudio



It was well after the witching hour, and many moons ago when I was driving home from my painting studio in Albany, New York, to the city of Troy.  The roads were an empty, slick asphaltum black that darkened as it began to rain.  My chariot and I were driving through water deep enough to have its own current (pardon the pun) when the lightning struck…

read the full history of these paintings here:

Where Lightning Hall Gets Its Name

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.